Wounds, Scars, and Renewal

Ten days from now will mark the twentieth year of my mother’s passing. Now, I am thirty-four with four children, then I was fourteen and the oldest of three children. There are a million things I desire to write in this post, as I know many of you read and follow my jagged grief journey, but the words which may follow are quite unplanned, and a culmination of many burdens within my own heart. 

There are many things for all of our past which can wound and scar a person. Wounded-ness, the evidence of unhealed hurts. Scarring, the evidence of the healing of those wounds.

I have a terrible and jagged, c-section scar. This scar from my first Caesarean surgery was reopened three other times. Each painful reopening of this scar brought forth both a new season and new life.

However, with each reopening, the scar which was life-giving was also the reopening of many stories of pain, but in a weird scientific way, healing.

Wounds heal. The most delicate and intimate wounds are made to heal and the healing of wounds leads to scarring. The scarring makes us who we are. The scarring a permanent marking of  life given and shared, even in the wounded-ness, we are made to heal.

When I think of scars, my immediate reaction is to think of knobbly, unsightly things. Today I went to the doctor with a raised mole, and it was immediately frozen away. Today, in our culture it is quite uncommon to bear knobbly, unsightly things above the social media filters of who we desire to be.

In our current culture, it is quite knobbly to say, I am bumpy, unfiltered, and broken. I have been wounded, and I have been scarred. The wounded wonder, am I loved even when my flesh is knobbly?

As a knobbly person, I have chosen to hide my knobbly places underneath the false mask of “I am okay” for far too long. A culture of anti-embracing scarred-ness has suffocated me.

Twenty-years after my mother’s passing, I am learning the simple truth that it is our scars that prove we have lived life. Our scars are beautiful because our scars are life giving. Scars are knobbly and imperfect, but so is life.

Scars are the evidence of renewal. You cannot change your wounds, but you can embrace the journey, see the scars as proof of healing, and embrace the knobbliness as evidence of healing.

I have spent two decades feeling deeply wounded around this time of year. Looking back to the open wound inflicted twenty years ago when my mother passed away, instead of recognizing my knobbly places as proof of healing.

Our wounds are not scientifically meant to stay open, our wounds are meant to heal. The unsightly scars are the things which make all of us less filtered, and more human.

This year, for me, renewal has meant thinking of my mother at her happiest, and finding that place. Wondering, if she were here, what would I be doing. This year, my family and I are going to the beach in memory of my mom and her smile. My mom was a happy person, she fought with a smile, and was happiest with her family and at the beach. Renewal for me entails embracing scars and creating happier, more emotionally-whole patterns.

I will be sad at the beach, remembering my happy mother. But in some full circle way, this will help me feel whole.

My kindergartener prayed tonight, “God thank you for giving us emotions and allowing us to be happy and sad.” Such a sweet reminder that life is happy, but it is also sad. Life gives wounds, and creates scars of healing. We are all a knobbly mixture of happiness and sadness.

In the bumps and bruises, wounds and scars, God is making all things new. God makes all things new through the wounds, bruises, and scars of Jesus. This week as I look towards the Resurrection and the Easter weekend, I am thankful that the God of the Bible is the One who can identify with those who are wounded and scarred.

By His wounds we are healed. Jesus identifies with the broken.

In my own scarred, knobbly renewal I’d dare to think my mom would rejoice in my knobbly sad and happy scarred-ness. Twenty years feels like a crazy amount of time, but each day I am more hopeful. Each day I believe more and more, that God is making all things new, through wounds and scars.

A Leap of Faith, An Ask for Help

Friends,

On my first mission trip, I am taking a huge leap of faith and I am asking you to consider supporting me financially as I serve this summer as a team member on church’s missions trip to Makovec, Croatia.

This June will mark the 20th anniversary of North Cincinnati Community Church’s ministry partnership with Makovec Baptist Church. Over the last two decades we have assisted this church in reaching its community with the gospel by helping to facilitate a free English camp for Croatian students. The camp was originally only offered for elementary aged students, however, was expanded to include middle school and high school students as those involved in the English Camp have grown. We have now had the privilege of seeing adults who attended the camp as children now send their own children as well. In the evening we also have the opportunity to encourage our ministry partners and to organize additional outreach events during the week.

As a country where Protestants make up less than 1% of the population, Croatia can be challenging place culturally to communicate the gospel. As Americans, our team is able to steward our own cultural influence in order to help the church engage a community where they are a significant minority and encourage our partners who minister in such a challenging context. The consistency of coming back year after over the last twenty years has cultivated a deep sense of community with our Croatian ministry partners and credibility in the eyes of the community in Makovec.

In order to serve as part of our team I seeking to raise $750. My role on the team is to teach memory verses to students ages second through sixth grade. I will teach the verses in English as well as partner with a Croatian team member to communicate the verses in Croatian for understanding. I am excited to see God use my gifts in teaching elementary school children to serve His Kingdom in global mission opportunities.

Please consider helping me to reach this goal by giving a tax-deductible gift. Donations can be made electronically at http://www.northcincy.org/short-term-mission-trips. Contributions can also be mailed directly to North Cincinnati Community, Mason OH 45040. If contributing by check, please write “Croatia Missions Trip” in the memo line of your check and include a note with my name.

Warmly,

Rachel

 

The Waiting Spaces

Unbelief in the Waiting Spaces

I battle against moments of unbelief when I find myself in the waiting rooms of daily life. These waiting rooms are the seasons I find myself waiting in the transitional and unknown places.

Will I find reconciliation in a relationship with a long time friend over a recent disagreement?

Will I get the position I have been waiting for?

Will my scans come back clean?

These are only a few of the waiting spaces I have found myself in over the past five years and these waiting spaces have been challenging for me to cling to faith and belief, even when I cannot see.

All too often I have noticed I am not the only one who lives this way. In our humanity, we desire for God to answer prayers like He is a tiny man inside a vending machine. An impatient heart may desire control and immediate answers instead of resting in God’s sovereign control and supernatural time-table. In unbelief and distorted desires, the human heart is prone to wander over to the instant gratification of faith in a microwave, instead of the slow unraveling of learning patience and trust in a God who is good even when we cannot see.

Life’s Temporary Waiting Spaces and Eyes that See

Not all waiting spaces are bothersome. In a restaurant, I am personally more irritated by those who ask the hostess every five minutes if their table is ready than I am irritated by my own forty-to-fifty minute wait. This comes from my short time and experience as a hostess. I know hostesses want to seat people in a restaurant as fast as they can.

When seated at my table, I am usually not bothered to wait for drinks, food, or a server. I identify with the process of waiting in a restaurant because I have experienced the life of a server too. In the life of a server, the tables seem to turn all at once and the needs of the customers sometimes seem outnumber the minutes in the hour.

I don’t mind waiting because I know behind the scenes there is so much more going on that I cannot see. In a restaurant there are servers, line cooks, expos, dishwashers, food runners, and every server has ongoing side work throughout the night. There are important front of the house needs, but what goes on behind the scenes, the things which our eyes can’t see, are all significant parts of the food to customer process.

While waiting at  my doctor, I think of this waiting room just the same way I wait on my glass of water in a restaurant. The waiting space is a piece of the puzzle in the bigger picture of going to the doctor. I value the time and attention my doctor gives to my own family, I can visualize what is going on behind the scenes while I am waiting for the doctor. I know I am waiting because my doctor is giving that same care to someone else in the next exam room, and when my turn comes I will receive the excellent, personal care I received just like the last time I was in for a check up.

I seem to be able to remember in life’s temporary waiting spaces.

Heart Issues in the Difficult Waiting Spaces 

When I first began reading the Bible in my early twenties, my husband was in seminary. As we traveled back and forth between seminary and home, we would read the Old Testament out loud to one another. I remember reading Old Testament passages like Exodus 16, when the Israelites have been brought out of slavery in Egypt, but still they are complaining about God’s provision for them in the desert. The Israelites all too easily forgot that God had delivered them from slavery, and He was bringing them to the Promised Land.

I used to ask Michael, “Why do the Israelites whine all the time? Why do they so easily forget?”

Well, now I know. Because I too am just like the Israelites in my own personal waiting spaces. I fail to wait patiently on the Lord and His timing.

In the waiting room of my own life, when I fail to see God working behind the scenes, I find myself checking in at the counter too often asking impatiently, Lord, when will my wait be over? When it comes to daily life and answers I need right now, I’m a constant bell-ringer, toe-tapper, and heavy-sigh huffer.

This comes from a desire to control. Control creeps up in my heart all too often. I toe-tap in my prayer life instead of sitting in the waiting spaces of life with hopefulness. With belief in the assurance that God is working behind the scenes, and trust that He is giving me the specific care my heart needs even while I wait.

Truth for the Fight to Believe in the Waiting Spaces

Slowly I am learning to fight to believe in the waiting spaces. It is in the waiting spaces that God is working in my heart in ways I cannot see. He is teaching me to lean into His Promises and remember that He is before all things and in Him all things hold together. It is in the waiting space where I see my distorted desire to control.

A few pages later in the Old Testament, the book of Deuteronomy is a call for the Israelites to remember. Remember what God has done before, and remember what God has Promised He will do in the future. When we feel impatient in the waiting spaces we need to soak our hearts in gospel truth. We need to remember that God is always working even when we cannot see.

Verses to Memorize and Use as a Balm for your Heart in the Waiting Spaces:

Exodus 14:14 The Lord will fight for you, you need only to be still.

Ecclesiastes 3:11 He makes everything beautiful in its time.

Psalm 27:14 When I wait you strengthen my heart.

Isaiah 40:31 But those who wait on the Lord will renew their strength.

Isaiah 41:10 Do not fear, I am with you.

Psalm 121:4 He who watches over Israel will never sleep or slumber.

Lamentations 3:22 The Lord’s lovingkindness will never cease, His compassions never fail, they are new every morning. Great is His faithfulness.

Philippians 1:6 He who began a good work in you, will bring it to completion.

Colossians 1:27 He is before all things and in Him all things hold together.

2 Corinthians 4:18 We look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.

Behold, He is making all things new. Even when we cannot see in the waiting spaces.

Unraveling Cynicism

Cynicism is Rooted in Woundedness

I am barely a teenager sitting in the front bedroom of my childhood home, a two-story brick house with green shutters. As I look out the window I am scared, depressed, uncertain. From a very young age I learn this world is not the way it is supposed to be. In 1991 my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. By the time I reach eighth grade in the fall of 1997, my mother is getting sicker instead of getting better.

At thirteen I want to be numb to everything around me. To feel the emotional pain raging within me and interact with the sad reality surrounding me is too much  for my barely teenage brain to bear. I learn how to disengage. I learn how to be numb to life’s difficulties.  My numbness pushes true friends away. In crowds I find myself surrounded by many people but somehow I always feel alone.

This disengagement and numbness eventually buds into cynicism and as an adult, I grow into a woman who engages the world as a full-blown cynic. Cynicism is one of the distorted ways in which I view the world.

“Cynicism creates a numbness toward life. Cynicism begins with a wry assurance that everyone has an angle. Behind every silver lining is a cloud. The cynic is always observing, critiquing, but never engaging, loving, and hoping…To be cynical is to be distant. While offering a false intimacy of being ‘in the know,’ cynicism actually destroys intimacy. It leads to bitterness that can deaden and even destroy the spirit.” Paul Miller, A Praying Life

The Tension Between Cynicism and The Gospel

My cynicism became a problem when I became a Christian at the age of twenty-one.

My new life in Christ and my old life built upon the foundation of cynicism in juxtaposition with one another. I find myself unable to fully engage with others within the church because of how deeply I am tangled up in my own cynicism.

Cynicism becomes deeply rooted and takes hold of how people grow to engage the world.

Cynicism sees the pretty girl walk into the room and assumes she is stupid or worse, assumes you don’t like her. The cynic sees the Christian who is always smiling as a person who lacks emotional depth. Tangled up in cynicism, we can’t see the greater redemptive story in ourselves, others, and the whole world because cynicism distorts hope.

Deeply rooted cynicism leads down the path of critiquing, over-thinking, never hoping and never fully trusting. A cynic may look friendly on the outside while the inner self of a cynic questions motives of others.

I like this definition of cynicism I found in an article on Desiring God:

Cynicism is the emotional disposition of distrust or rejection toward a particular idea, person, or group as a result of negative experiences (either directly or indirectly).

New life in Christ brings tension between the old and the new self. There is tension between the desires of the way you have always lived, and the way you are called to live in the gospel of Christ.

The unraveling of the old pattern of cynicism is necessary in the Christian life so Christians can live in the community we have been called to live with one another, the community founded on the gospel, where Jesus is the cornerstone. The community of the Church. This is a community call to love one another with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love. (Ephesians 4:2)

So I say, walk by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the flesh. For the flesh desires what is contrary to the Spirit, and the Spirit what is contrary to the flesh. They are in conflict with each other, so that you are not to do whatever you want. (Galatians 5:16-17)

Robert Robinson is an 18th century pastor, hymnodist, and writer of the hymn: Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing. My favorite part of this hymn illustrates my above point. This hymn was written in the 1700s and describes the same tension I feel in my daily life between my cynicism and call to love others fully the gospel in 2018, three hundred years later.

O to grace how great a debtor Daily I’m constrained to be!
Let they goodness, like a fetter, Bind my wandering heart to thee
Prone to wander, Lord I feel it, Prone to leave the God I love.
Here’s my heart. O take and seal it; Seal it for thy courts above.

We live in the now and the not yet. We have foretasted heaven in our own redemption, but the world is not yet fully redeemed. In the now and the not yet as those who claim the name of Jesus, we wait and we dance with our prone to wandering hearts.

How to Unravel Deeply Rooted Cynicism 

First, self-awareness is the most basic step to unraveling cynicism. A person cannot be unraveled from cynicism if the person is are unaware he or she has the plaguing problem of cynicism. Step one is self-awareness of the problem, the gospel, and our wandering hearts

Second, embrace the process. The healing from cynicism does not happen overnight. We live in a microwave world. Books are delivered to our fingertips, groceries are amazon primed in two hours. Sanctification does not happen in a microwave. It is the slow unraveling of the old self and faith to embrace the new self.

Third, the gospel invites us into freedom from our old unhealthy patterns. In the gospel, we can be free from the heavy yoke of slavery to cynicism. You have to see the heavy yoke of cynicism in the way you see the world and desire to be free from that heavy burden upon your shoulders.

It is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Stand firm, then, and do not let yourselves be burdened again by a yoke of slavery. You, my brothers and sisters, were called to be free. But do not use your freedom to indulge the flesh; rather, serve one another humbly in love. (Galatians 5: 1,13)

Fourth, recognize cynical patterns, memorize scriptures to replace those cynical patterns, and ask God to change you from the inside out.

Put off your old self, which belongs to your former manner of life, and to be renewed in the spirit of your minds, and to put on the new self, created after the likeness of God in true righteousness and holiness. (Ephesians 4:22-24)

It is critical to begin to recognize the cynical bend in your thought life toward cynicism. It is also critical to be transformed in your mind to the patterns of cynicism. Nothing spiritual is happening without the step of being renewed from the inside out, through the renewing of your mind. This renewal happens by knowing the Word of God and asking you knowledge of the Word to change the way you live. Without the middle step of renewal and transformation, our battles against cynicism will only be surface deep.

When I look back and see freedom from the yoke of slavery of cynicism, I see hope for the teenager standing in her bedroom. I see a life much bigger than she could have ever dreamed up for herself. A life where she eventually learned to show up, be vulnerable, and allowed herself to be seen. A life where cynicism didn’t distort her view of others, but love rooted in the gospel helped her see others, and even herself with the eyes of Jesus.

“Courage starts with showing up and allowing ourselves to be seen.” Brene Brown

30 Simple Freezer Meals

Every other month I prepare close to thirty meals for my freezer. I am a mom to four kids, a wife to a busy pastor, and I need dinner to be thought for and simple.

I am not a culinary wizard. All of these meals are super easy. All these meals are yummy. And my kids will eat most of these meals. My husband is also a happy camper because this way of cooking saves us money. When I have a plan for dinner, we order pizza and eat out less. I also don’t spend extra money of foods we don’t eat. We eat every meal I make over the course of six weeks. If my husband is happy and my kids are eating, I’m a happy mom.

Yesterday I did a facebook live video to show my friends how easy it is to prep these meals, and I was asked to share some of the recipes. Most of these recipes us Wildtree ingredients. Wildtree is a company that sells USDA organic, preservative free sauces and seasonings. I love Wildtree, but I do not sell Wildtree. I have a few friends that do and I’d be happy to point you in their direction.

If you don’t use Wildtree products, don’t let that stop you from making a few freezer meals. Most of these seasonings can be found in the aisles of your local grocery store. I said this in my Facebook Live video yesterday, this is about what do you already have, and what is easy to make. In January I was low on all my favorite Wildtree seasonings and I just worked with what I had in my pantry. In January, I made enough meals to stock my freezer until the end of February.

We buy all our ground beef, steaks, salmon, chicken, and pork at Costco. My husband actually does all the shopping. Realistically he spent $140 on proteins at Costco, $30 on pantry staples, and I just went to a Wildtree party to restock my favorite items, I spent $180. The Wildtree and pantry staples will last me about a year, the $180 Wildtree cost is not an every time Freezer Meal expense. Even if it was, we spent $350 dollars on dinners that will last us six weeks (conservative estimate, sometimes they last eight weeks). According to my math, it will cost us about $55.00 a week to feed my family of six dinner. That sounds pretty good. It costs us $35.00 to eat at Chick-fil-a just one time.

Recipes. I’m going to share them in the order I made them on the Facebook Live video. Here is the link to the facebook video:

 

Pork Freezer Meals:

One package of pork tenderloins from Costco, contains 4 tenderloins, cost ~$20. Eight meals.

 

Asian Pulled Pork Sandwiches *feeds my family 2 nights

One tenderloin

1/2 cup frozen chopped onions

1/2 cup Asian Zing Buffalo Wild Wings Sauce

2 Tablespoons of Sesame Oil

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Crock on low from frozen for 6-8 hours. Serve on sandwiches.

 

Mojo Pork Tacos *feeds my family 2 nights

One Tenderloin

1/2 jar of Wildtree Mojo Sauce

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Crock on low from frozen for 6-8 hours. Serve on tortillas, in burrito bowls, with taco topping of your choice.

 

Asian Pork Tenderloin *feeds us two nights, a family favorite

Two tenderloins

1/2 cup soy sauce

2 1/2 Tablespoon sesame oil

2 Tablespoon minced garlic

2 Teaspoon lime juice

2 teaspoon rice wine vinegar

1 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1/2 teaspoon sugar

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag, sear defrosted loin in a hot pan, bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes.

 

Ground beef Freezer Meals:

One package of ground beef from Costco, divided into four gallon ziplock bags. ~$20, for seven meals.

 

Not So Sloppy Sliders, feeds my family 2 nights

Ground Beef

1/2 cup chopped frozen onion

1 teaspoon mustard

3T Sloppy Joe Blend (Wildtree, can be and sloppy Joe seasoning)

1 6oz jar of tomato paste (I subbed ketchup)

1 teaspoon light brown sugar

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Crock on low from frozen for 6-8 hours. Serve on sandwiches or with slider buns.

 

Best Burgers Ever *feeds my family 1 night

Ground Beef

1 Tablespoon Chipotle Lime Rub (Wildtree)

1 Teaspoon Ranch Steak Rub (Wildtree)

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag, then pay ground beef to form burgers. Grill.

 

Hearty Spaghetti Sauce, feeds my family 2 nights

Ground Beef

2 Tablespoons Minced Garlic

1/2 cup chopped onions

1 can diced tomatoes

2 Tablespoons Smoked Tomato Mozzarella Blend (Wildtree)

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag. Brown seasoned ground beef in skillet. Add red spaghetti sauce of choice. Toss with pasta.

 

Hearty Meatloaf, feeds my family 2 nights

Ground Beef

1 cup of breadcrumbs

2 eggs, beaten

2 tsp garlic galore seasoning (Wildtree)

1/2 cup onion

4 Tablespoon Smoked Tomato Mozzarella Blend

1/2 cup ketchup

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Shape into a loaf pan. Bake in the oven 400 degrees, 40 minutes.

 

Salmon Freezer Meals:

purchased at Costco ~$25. Cut into 10 fillets to feed our family three nights

 

Salmon Scampi

2 Tablespoons Wildtree Roasted Garlic Grapeseed Oil

2 Tablespoon Wildtree Scampi Blend

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Grill salmon fillets.

 

Chipotle Ranch Salmon

2 Tablespoons Wildtree Roasted Garlic Grapeseed Oil

2 Tablespoons Wildtree Chipotle Ranch Seasoning

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Grill salmon fillets.

 

Wicked Good Salmon, a family favorite

Salmon Fillets

1/2 cup of Wicked Good Sauce

2 Tablespoons Brown Sugar

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Bake Salmon on a lined or greased baking sheet. 400 degrees for 12-15 minutes.

 

Steak Freezer Meals:

We chose Ribeyes from Costco, we get whatever is a good deal. ~30 for two meals

 

My Favorite Steak Rub

1 Tablespoon Wildtree Garlic Galore

1 Tablespoon Italian Dressing Mix

1 Tablespoon Wildtree Ranch Steak Rub

2-3 Tablespoons Wildtree Roasted Garlic Grapeseed Oil

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Grill steaks.

 

My Favorite Marinade

1/2 cup Soy Sauce.

2 TBSP olive oil.

1/2 cup brown sugar.

1/2 tsp Season All {or any type of all-purpose seasoning salt}

1/4 tsp ground ginger.

1/4 tsp black pepper.

1/4 tsp garlic powder.

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Grill steaks.

 

Chicken Freezer Meals:

we chose 24 chicken breasts from Costco, ~50 about 12 meals

 

Sweet Onion Chicken, one meal

3 chicken breasts

1/2 jar of Wildtree Sweet Onion Spread

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Bake in a preheat oven. 350 degrees, 30 minutes.

 

Ranch Chicken Chili, 2 meals, a family favorite

3 chicken breasts

1 bag frozen corn

1 can diced tomatoes

4 Tablespoons Chick Broth

1 bag of Wildtree Creamy Ranch Mix (Or 2 1/2 Tablespoons of Ranch Dip Mix)

1/2 teaspoon of Wildtree Spicy Carne Asada Seasoning

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Can put this bag in frozen, in the crock pot. In the last 30 minutes of slow cooking, stir in one block of room temperature cream cheese cut into cubes.

 

Lemon Dijon Chicken, 1 meal

3 chicken Breasts

1 Tablespoon Roasted Garlic Grapeseed Oil

1 Tablespoon Wildtree European Dipping Oil-Balsamic

1 Tablespoon Lemon Pepper

1 Tablespoon Red Bell Pepper and Garlic Seasoning

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Grill Chicken

 

Honey Balsamic Chicken, one meal, a family favorite

3 Chicken Breasts

1/2 cup soy sauce

1/2 cup Wildtree European Dipping Oil, Balsamic

1/2 cup honey

1/2 cup brown sugar

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Bake in a preheat oven. 350 degrees, 30 minutes.

 

Chipotle Pineapple Chicken, one meal

3 Chicken Breasts

1/2 jar of Wildtree Chipotle Pineapple Marinade

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Grill.

 

Chicken Scampi, 2 meals, a family favorite

3 chicken breasts

3 Tablespoons Roasted Garlic Grapeseed Oil

1/4 cup parmesan cheese

3 Tablespoons Wildtree Scampi Blend

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Bake in a preheat oven. 350 degrees, 30 minutes. Add to pasta and cream sauce.

 

Zesty Lime Fajitas, 2 meals

3 Chicken Breasts

1/2 cup onion

1 teaspoon lime juice

2 Tablespoons Wing Sauce

2 Tablespoons Roasted Garlic Grapeseed Oil

2 Tablespoons Taco Seasoning

1 teaspoon Wildtree Ranch Steak Rub

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Or dump in crock pot from frozen. Defrosted bag can cook for 4 hours on low. Frozen bag, 6-8 hours on low.

 

Chicken Tacos, a family favorite, 2 meals

3 Chicken Breasts

1 cup chicken broth

3 Tablespoons of Taco Seasoning

Add all ingredients to a gallon ziplock, smoosh the ingredients around from outside of the bag. Double bag, label with a sharpie. When it comes time to cook. Defrost bag in fridge. Or dump in crock pot from frozen. Defrosted bag can cook for 4 hours on low. Frozen bag, 6-8 hours on low.

Happy Freezer Meal Making!